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What is the difference between quantum mechanics and quantum physics?

Quantum mechanics is the current name of the field of quantum physics. In quantum mechanics, physicists study how atoms, the components of atoms, and other tiny particles behave. These are called “quantum particles” and include electrons, protons, photons, and so on. They follow the laws of quantum mechanics. In the early 1900’s, physicists, through experiments, …

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Are electrons waves or particles?

The accompanying video demonstrates how an electron can be both a particle and a wave. (The video has two unfortunate errors in it, which I’ll point out.) The video shows how different kinds of objects, including an electron, act when they speed towards a barrier perforated by two slits. Then, it shows the pattern the …

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Why does the Born Rule predict quantum probabilities?

There’s both a mathematical explanation and an explanation based on the nature of reality. First, the mathematical explanation: Let’s take the example of the Double Slit Experiment. A laser shoots photons one-at-a-time through the two slits of a screen towards a photographic plate. The wave function is the equation that describes the behavior of the …

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How do we know a quantum particle is in a superposition if detecting the particle will destroy the superposition?

It’s not possible to KNOW that the particle is in a superposition of states since we can’t observe the superposition. The superposition idea is trying to explain what must be happening in the real world given that Schrodinger’s Wave Equation works. Schrodinger’s Wave Equation (and later upgrades like the equations of Quantum Electrodynamics) are very successful …

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How do I get started in learning quantum mechanics?

Videos on the Youtube channel “Looking Glass Universe” provide the clearest intro to quantum mechanics that I’ve found. They don’t require math nor a prior knowledge of physics, and they take it slow. However, they really get you into the midst of quantum mechanics. It’s not a light once-over. Of course, start with #1 and …

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